Social Networking Agency

Hashtags should be a powerful means of grouping people together so that those that are similar in some specific way can find each other. Unfortunately this usually doesn’t work as well as it could. I’m going to discuss some ways in which they work and ways in which they don’t. Subject matter hashtags These are the ones that work best, and offer an immediate way to join a conversation on a subject that’s bang up to date. This doesn’t work so well for marketers looking for customers, because most customers won’t add a hashtag for what they’re looking for.

 

You might want to think of some creative way to tap into the potential market of a trending tag, sites like WhatTheTrend It’s should give you some ideas, most of these won’t have sales potential, but with a little patience, you might find one that fits. Then use a twitter client to scan the time-line and @potentialcustomers individually with pre-typed messages. Twubs is another useful site to get a better sense of a hashtag and how it’s used. It’ll show the time-line, pictures, related tags, and top contributors.

It’s also worth searching for any hashtags that aren’t obviously going to have popular streams, you might find that no-one uses them. Twubs Following back You can use hashtags to advertise that you follow back with popular tags like #followback, #ifollowback and #instantfollowback. You could also use them be promote other users that follow back, which is a lot more meaningful than the typical promotion tags used like #follow and #FF. But be aware that a lot of people tagged with this won’t actually follow back, some people only follow a few people so their stream remains interesting and relevant to them, these are often people that use Twitter mostly for tweet socialising. This is annoying, especially when these people could just list those they want to follow and can watch the list time-line in a client like TweetDeck. Nevertheless I’ve tried this tactic, and it works. Twitter groups A lot of people seem to want to start their own Twitter groups, annoyingly these are often either pointless groups without any stated purpose other than allow some person to say ‘founder of …’.

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